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Song by Paul Hardcastle from 1985 that was new to me. Not new to more than a million others:

Where much of the footage is from Vietnam Requiem, addressing post-traumatic stress of Vietnam veterans.

Average age

When the brain matures at 25

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Penultimate

When reflecting on one’s time, is it preferable, if not necessary, to perceive that one has made a difference? To be able to point out to a particular incident that defines one’s contribution, assuming that one needs definition?

Some take the position that it doesn’t matter what one does in life, as long as that which one is doing is in accordance with religious principles. Follow the religion and the religious mark is made, with your role as functionary.

When does one create one’s own future paradise
When does one need to create one’s own future paradise

The bonds of retribution

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Elocution

Saw the 2016 film by and about James Baldwin, I Am Not Your Negro. So many scenes of perfect elocution, speaking without hesitation:

A barrister who never was.

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External Acceleration

Friend found out that a number of people her friends knew were coming to Canada to give birth. Paying for private medical care. The issue of “instant citizenship” was one matter, but the other question for her is why people from outside of Canada could pay for preferred medical care, while people within Canada could not.

Turns out it is becoming bigger business in Canada, with certain hospitals setting up specific programs to welcome foreign payors:

Public Hospitals Prifiting from Foreign Patients

Marleen Troster and Francesca Fionda, Global News, March 5, 2015

Canadian patients cannot pay for treatment in a publicly funded hospital. That would violate Canada’s Health Act. But foreign patients can.

And it’s been happening inside hospitals at Toronto’s University Health Network – known as UHN – for more than three years.

Pierre Laplante has been a nurse for some 40 years. He was shocked back in the spring of 2012 when he started asking questions about some patients from Libya…

Since 2011 UHN has treated 621 foreign patients, mostly cancer and cardiac patients, from 23 different countries. Those patients generated nearly $30 million in profits.

“I was point blank told at this stage of the game that they were bringing in revenues for the unit.”

The hospital profited from these patients. And few, if any, Canadians knew about it until Laplante went public. “I don’t feel as a nurse, as an Ontarian, as a Canadian that I was properly consulted on having these patients brought here. It’s medical tourism without Canadian knowledge.”

When a Canadian wishes to pay for accelerated service, the Canadian must go to another country.

Yet

What comes up in these conversations is the Australian health care model–private and public sector choices…

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Triage

Friend was waiting for call from the specialist health team, to which he had been referred. Getting anxious when no call. Had been told his case was “triaged“.

So if no call, must mean that things are not that urgent.

Not necessarily. Could mean that I am beyond help.

Anxiety in the silence of no ring. Left on the battlefield of life.

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Paradigm Revision

Thomas Kuhn talks about a “paradigm shift” through first principles that end up subject to later challenge and consequent “revolutionary” abandonment. Either the world is flat or it isn’t. Either the earth orbits around the sun or it doesn’t.

However, when one gets away from pure science or medicine, the “either/or” would seem to become more qualified. Don’t challenge first principles and one ends up with the collapse of the Soviet Union. China, on the other hand, grows to adopt capitalism within a continuing socialistic political model and residually socialistic economic model.

Both Russia and China subject to significant changes. Form of paradigm shift in Russia? Form of “paradigm revision” in China?

And, in terms of accounting information, is it more than “either it’s useful for investment decisions or it is not”?

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Paul Revere and The Raiders: Peace of Mind

Song from Goin’ to Memphis, Paul Revere and The Raiders album from 1968.

Song was single release from the album, and the only song on the album where Paul Revere and The Raiders actually performed. Rest of the album was basically a solo album by Mark Lindsay, as produced and directed by Chips Moman.

Remember the song going through one’s head when writing grade 10 final exams that June.

Now everybody seems to love it
No there ain’t a single thing above it
And if you’ve ever done without it

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Lungs, Pancreas

Surprisingly, fewer than 10 percent of lifelong smokers will get lung cancer. Fewer yet will contract the long list of other cancers, such as throat or mouth cancers. In the game of risk, you’re more likely to have a condom break than to get cancer from smoking.

That the majority of smokers beat cancer doesn’t make for effective anti-smoking campaigning. So the statistics are turned around: Smoking accounts for 30 percent of all cancer deaths and 87 percent of lung cancer deaths; the risk of developing lung cancer is about 23 times higher in male smokers compared to non-smokers…

Christopher Wanjek, “Smoking’s Many Myths Examined“. Live Science, November 18, 2008

Smoking is one of the most important risk factors for pancreatic cancer. The risk of getting pancreatic cancer is about twice as high among smokers compared to those who have never smoked. About 20% to 30% of pancreatic cancers are thought to be caused by cigarette smoking…

American Cancer Society, “Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors

…Still, recent studies have pointed to several common factors that might promote or inhibit the growth of this formidable disease. By far the most suspect cause is cigarette smoking. Although previous studies have shown a doubling of risk among smokers, a new study of 490 patients in Los Angeles County revealed that smoking a pack or more a day was associated with a fivefold to sixfold increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer.

…as Dr. [Eli] Glatstein put it: “Right now we’re all grasping for straws. This is a tumor against which we’ve not made one single improvement in the last 30 to 40 years.”

Jane E. Brody, “Pancreatic cancer: Cigarette smoking is strongest link to deadly disease“. New York Times, March 25, 1986

Less than thirty years on, and Patrick Swayze is pleased to have made it through a year, before succumbing.

Missing piece of data. If 10% of smokers get lung cancer, yet the vast majority of lung cancers are associated with smoking, this seems to mean that lung cancer is caused by smoking and at least one other factor. With pancreatic cancer, could not find what percentage of smokers get it. Rather, the statistic is that 20% to 30% of pancreatic cancers are associated with smoking. The closer one can relate the percentage of cancer associations to the percentage of smokers, it would appear that there is a greater move towards a principal cause, rather than “smoking and”.

Benefit of knowing whether smoking puts one on a faster track to pancreatic cancer than lung cancer?

Since when did an addict

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Driver

Have written here and here about how people, when faced with the knowledge of terminal illness, often then accomplish so much. Unfortunate that we often don’t see the short line.

Still amazed when watching Patrick Swayze in The Beast, pushing through pain to move away from the pancreatic cancer that was killing him, daily.

I’m trying to shut up and let my angels speak to me

There’s a line. So we know where to cross.

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67 or 76: Orphans

An almost usual bombing in Baghdad, from some two years now.

Calling them rejectionists, justifying obliteration.

Could be 76

Or 67

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