Words in Context

Asked my legal colleague if she was a better family law lawyer, now that she had gone through her own divorce.

She agreed.

Know a fair bit about estates, both in terms of law practice and in terms of the death of both parents. Know a fair bit about estates, and estate-referenced tensions. All the emotions from decades past coming out.

The rawness.

The insults.

The grievances.

Advise my clients that just about everyone in the family will be out of their minds for at least a year, following such death. Anything that anyone says in such context must be discounted. Almost 100% discounted.

Otherwise, one is into madness-based litigation, where lawyers will be feeding off the corpus of the estate.

Same thing happens when marriages collapse. First issue, for many lawyers, is how much equity is left in the matrimonial home. The corpus of the feed.

Similar to a death in a family, a divorce involves its own particular death, with similar madness in the reactions.

Sometimes clients see where I am coming from, and heed the advice. No rampup, no castigation.

Sometimes they don’t, and I hand off the file.

I know where matters will lead, and don’t want to be a witness, if not a party, to the roilings.

All love gone

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About brucelarochelle

Practising Lawyer and Part-Time University Instructor (Accounting, Commercial Law, Organizational Behaviour); Part-Time Federal Tribunal Member. Non-practising Chartered Professional Accountant (Chartered Accountant and Certified Management Accountant).
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