How it might stop

With respect to “How it might start“, relating to how prejudices can form, Neil Remington Abramson commented as follows:

I’d have taken the $10. I’d have assumed it was an act of repentance; that what she’d done had bothered her, as she sat there selling tickets, comparing it to her confessed Christian values at a benevolent time of the year. No sincere Christmas spirit.

And I’d have thought that my Christian values would expect me to forgive, so thanks and a kind word would be in order, both ways. A rueful smile. An acknowledgement that it could have been me doing it to her, I suppose, if you were really trying. Despite the angry feelings.

And I wonder if part of the problem in our world is not just that it is so unforgiving, but that sorry people’s repentance is thrown back at them? Is it not a sin to refuse to forgive a sincerely sorry person? And since we cannot know true sincerity, aren’t we supposed to leave judging that to God. How many times? Jesus says a lot. Until you really mean it, I guess.

I agree with you, right up to the point where you let your anger rule you, and didn’t see this alternative, during the quiet time of writing your condemnation. Jesus says look at yourself. I am far from perfect, but these days I am a Presbyterian (actually, a Presbyterian Elder now), so what can you do?

Me, a cheap Scot??

Prejudice is hard, if we’re all one, under God’s eyes. Prejudice is harder, if we’re looking at our own failings, rather than those of others.

She wasn’t perfect; you weren’t; I’m not; that’s why we need Grace.

Thanks be to the God of “second chances” and “it’s not over, until it’s over, if then”.

There’s always a next time.

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About brucelarochelle

Practising Lawyer and Part-Time University Instructor (Accounting, Commercial Law, Organizational Behaviour); Part-Time Federal Tribunal Member. Non-practising Chartered Professional Accountant (Chartered Accountant and Certified Management Accountant).
This entry was posted in Christmas, Prejudice, Presbyterianism. Bookmark the permalink.

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