Rapa Nui

Was watching APTN and this 1994 film came on, Rapa Nui, concerning aboriginal class struggles in pre-New Zealand. Thought it was quite good, in terms of showing parallel emotions across time and cultures. Thought of how couldn’t recall a similar history of particular North American tribes, pre-colonial discovery. How much does one know about the Iroquois, the Cree…somebody saying there are several dialects of Cree…

So thought the film was quite good, and important. Then read Roger Ebert review:

…The king is of the Long Ear tribe, which has enslaved the Short Ears and impoverished the island by building dozens of giant stone faces. The purpose of the faces is to attract the great White Canoe which the king believes will carry him off to heaven. No face can be big enough. “Build another one,” he tells the slaves at one point. “Then take the rest of the day off.” This is a king, played with superb comic timing by Eru Potaka-Dewes, who has lots of good lines. “Tell me you won’t make fish hooks of my thigh bones,” he tearfully implores his high priest.

The priest, however, has the movie’s best line: “I’m busy! I’ve got chicken entrails to read!” Meanwhile, sweating slaves pull giant sledges and plot rebellion.

…Concern for my reputation prevents me from recommending this movie. I wish I had more nerve. I wish I could simply write, “Look, of course it’s one of the worst movies ever made. But it has hilarious dialogue, a weirdo action climax, a bizarre explanation for the faces of Easter Island, and dozens if not hundreds of wonderful bare breasts.” I am however a responsible film critic and must conclude that “Rapa Nui” is a bad film. If you want to see it anyway, of course, that’s strictly your concern. I think I may check it out again myself.

Oh well…

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About brucelarochelle

Practising Lawyer and Part-Time University Instructor (Accounting, Commercial Law, Organizational Behaviour); Part-Time Federal Tribunal Member. Non-practising Chartered Professional Accountant (Chartered Accountant and Certified Management Accountant).
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