Statistical Failure II

Wrote about being the LOWest of THE LOW on a mid-term exam in an M.B.A statistics course. Plus, exams distributed so that one was publicly known to be so.

Question arises as to how one passes a course, in such circumstances. Had already withdrawn from one M.B.A. course during an earlier term, and was concerned about any pattern starting of withdrawing from courses, in terms of completing the degree, which was being studied as a part-time student, at that point. Could only afford to go full-time for one term, which came later, and sooner.

Spoke with the professor. Offered to show him that I knew a reasonable amount of the course material. I believe he suggested, or agreed to, a second, non-credit midterm, which I wrote, and on which he advised me I had performed in a reasonable manner.

Then came the final. All those around presumably wondering how the LOWest of THE LOW was going to do this time, and why he was still in the class. General autistic tendencies were once again helpful; didn’t notice any stares or snickers.

In the M.B.A. program at the time, one needed to maintain a “B” average. The lowest passing mark possible in a course was a C+, considered to be a conditional pass. Message in the C+: Get out of here, and don’t come back.

Received a C+. No more statistics courses in the M.B.A. program for me.

On a strict numerical basis, it was impossible for me to pass the course, based on the mid-term result. The professor informally gave me a second chance, for which I remained (and remain) very, very grateful. Something called professional judgement. Well-placed, in my biased view.

Still, when I later encountered him at a conference…how could any student be set up as the LOWest

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About brucelarochelle

http://www.lmslawyers.com/bruce-la-rochelle
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