The Olde Country

Saskatoon house 1

Legal colleague was visiting Saskatoon. Mentioned the childhood home, and that of Neil Remington Abramson beside it. She visited, and took pictures.

The trees. Don’t remember any trees.

Do remember, then and now, the architectural marvel of the Abramson house. Fifty-five years old, and still ahead of its time.

Saskatoon Abramson house

Then she took pictures of the view from the house. The experimental farm of the University of Saskatchewan.

Saskatoon fields

Remember the expanse. How in the winter, one could walk over the fences, with snowdrifts so high and packed.

What reference, and what illusions. Somebody stayed the same.

Saskatoon Abramson house 2

__________________________________________________________
Postscript, July 5, 2015: Thank you, Gabriela Fuentealba:

Saskatoon house Gabriela

Postscript, July 9, 2015: Neil Remington Abramson identifies the architect of his childhood home as John Holliday-Scott.

Advertisements

About brucelarochelle

http://www.lmslawyers.com/bruce-la-rochelle
This entry was posted in Saskatoon Reflections. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to The Olde Country

  1. As close as I can recall, my mother and stepfather built their house in 1959-60. I started grade 1 at Haultain School and moved to Grosvenor Park School in early June. I think my parents sold the house in 1979, my mother moving to Victoria and Ed, my stepfather, to a two story walk-up in Sutherland. They remained married, but she found a position at the School of Social Work at UVictoria, while he continued in the Sociology Department at USask. They were reunited permanently in 1982, upon retirement.

    The house is 55 years old. Our family only occupied it for the first 20 years. I wonder – it must have changed a lot inside, even though externally it is still recognizable. It’d be nice to see the changes, perhaps. Or perhaps not, since the original interior may only now exist in my imagination and memory.

    But if it were my house, I would want modern and larger bathrooms, and bigger bedrooms. It was fashionable in the 1960s. Now I think the larger interior public spaces would still hold their own, but the private spaces might seem old-fashioned.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s